06/22/18 7:30am

A completely renovated mansion in the town of Newburgh known as Sweetwood Inn. This home sits on 1.5 acres and has 9 bedrooms. A perfect set up for entertaining out of town guests or housing a large family. It has been tastefully updated and is right next to the Fostertown Elementary School. Sad to see the owners leave to be closer to family.

362 Fostertown Road Newburgh NY
Asking Price: $419,000
Year Built: 1847
Size: 3,520 sq ft
Neighborhood: Balmville
Taxes: $5,523
Distance to NYC: 55.7 mi, 1 hr 2 mins
Public Transportation: MetroNorth to Beacon, then take ferry across
Closest Roadways: 9W, I-87, I-84
Google Map
Listing by: Kathleen Carhart, RE/MAX

 

06/15/18 11:30am

The weekly link roundup is a collection of links related to Newburgh, revitalization, urban planning and anything else that might inspire change or create dialogue. Photo by Steven Rosas.

$70M Newburgh project in jeopardy [THR]
Crystal Lake recreation area restored [THR]
Newburgh water voted Orange County’s best [THR]
Newburgh Ministry to develop housing for homeless [THR]
Illuminated festival reflects Newburgh’s bright future [THR]
Newburgh is training new cops, but losing them to higher paying departments [MHN]

Add your own photos depicting city life to the Newburgh Restoration flickr pool to be used on the blog, or email me. **Flickr users please do not forget to remove disabling of downloading of pictures. Otherwise, I can’t use them** Please do not take photos for your own use without consulting the photographer.

06/12/18 7:30am

If you have ever visited Washington’s Headquarters, you might have passed the historic AME Zion Church on Washington Street right in front of the municipal parking lot. An article and video published in the Times Herald-Record on May 28, 2018, announced that the local congregation is considering tearing down the church, and the adjacent structure to take advantage of two empty side lots they have purchased to build 50 affordable apartments.

When examining this area contextually, there has been much loss of historic buildings. In the last decade alone, half of East Parmenter Street and other surrounding buildings have been demolished due to deterioration from neglect, and the municipal parking lot wasn’t always an empty space, it used to be a factory. It should also be of note, that just steps away at 135-137 Washington is a men’s shelter. The Clinton Hotel isn’t far behind from completely collapsing – all of this steps away from one of Newburgh’s richest assets, Washington’s Headquarters.

Orange County Historian, Johanna Yaun, wrote about the historical significance of the building in her newsletter:

In 2020 Newburgh will celebrate the 150th anniversary of Frederick Douglass’s jubilee march along Washington Street. The leaders of the AME Zion Church used his appearance to mark the passing of the 15th Amendment, which granted voting rights to African American men. By 1870 the church had already become a symbol of liberty, nicknamed “the freedom church” thanks to its associations with the Underground Railroad.

Although the 1905 structure that stands now is not the modest house of worship built by the congregation’s founders, and not the same walls that reverberated the booming voice of Frederick Douglass from the pulpit that’s still used today, this building is a symbol of the grand strides of the African-American community in Newburgh as they passed on the flame of civil advocacy for centuries.

In an age when the American public is making an effort to remove monuments of oppression and contextualize historical symbols in our society, why are we not looking to preserve and elevate the symbols of the struggle for equality? This church would have been an incredible source of pride and progress at a time when “separate but equal” was the law of the land. As a monument, this building combats offensive cultural symbols from the past. It doesn’t put any one person on a pedestal, recognizing that true progress comes from the strength of the right to assembly. Also, it gets away from isolating one date or accomplishment, acknowledging that the struggle for equality has been sustained through generations.

Sincerely,

Johanna Yaun
Orange County Historian

06/08/18 11:30am

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The weekly link roundup is a collection of links related to Newburgh, revitalization, urban planning and anything else that might inspire change or create dialogue. Photo by Cher Vick.

Newburgh seeking members for arts, parking boards [THR]
City Helps Manhattan’s Garment District Hang on by a Thread [WSJ]
Newburgh Illuminated highlights city culture with food, dance and diversity [SN]
Newburgh Illuminated honors local business woman in memory of late mayor [SN]
Newburgh Boys & Girls Club seeks $500K for new performing arts, education center [THR]

Add your own photos depicting city life to the Newburgh Restoration flickr pool to be used on the blog, or email me. **Flickr users please do not forget to remove disabling of downloading of pictures. Otherwise, I can’t use them** Please do not take photos for your own use without consulting the photographer.

06/07/18 7:35am

Change is in the air for Chambers Street. The Holland Tunnel Art Gallery opened its doors May 25th to a packed open house. Some commented they couldn’t believe it was the same Chambers Street, and others remembered a time when the building housed illegal activities. It couldn’t be further from its former life with all the families and children in attendance. The owner, Paulien Lethen, says the space will be a venue for exhibitions, performances, concerts and movie screenings. Just an example of the potential of Newburgh’s stock.

06/06/18 7:30am

This past weekend was the Newburgh Illuminated Festival. It’s a labor of love and pride for the city; a day for everyone to gather and share the hope they have for this city. The festival proves:

  1. That people will come to Downtown Newburgh. It was single file walking room on Liberty between Broadway and Washington
  2. People will park their cars and walk the city
  3. Yes, people are willing to spend their money here

The challenge is translating this energy into new business creation and tourism for the city. How can we replicate a fraction of this on a daily basis?  I’m not sure I have the answer, but enjoy the photos that show what a future Newburgh could look like.