09/02/15 11:30am

nowhere ever after movie

A new film, Nowhere Ever After is being filmed on Liberty Street. It has been creating a lot of excitement for businesses that will be used, like the Wherehouse and Jenny’s Floral Designs, which will be transformed into the Rome College Bookstore. The film is staring Melanie Lynskey (Rose from Two and a Half Men) and Nelsan Ellis (Lafayette from True Blood).

Almost three years ago, I attended a meeting that discussed how Newburgh could attract the film industry to the city. Since then, quite a few productions have been filmed in Newburgh, especially at Umbra Soundstage which has one of the few airplane stages north of New York City.

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09/02/15 7:30am

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On the evening of September 19, 2015, beginning at 6:30pm, SASRE Properties and DMRM, present SALO: Newburgh, a chef’s table experience. The event will be hosted by Atlas Studios, located at 11 Spring Street, Newburgh, NY 12550.

The Salo Project is an underground pop up dinner founded by Filipina chef, Yana Gilbuena, who has been touring all 50 states bringing Kamayan style (hands on) Filipino food. Read more about here here: instagram, and here: project blog.

“We thought bringing Yana to Newburgh just made sense. She uses her craft to build community and has launched her own Filipino food movement across all 50 states, while bringing together like-minded individuals at each stop. SALO: Newburgh is a great opportunity for the Newburgh community and beyond, to come together and get our hands dirty, share stories, form new relationships, and have a great time.”
–Presenters

Food will be sourced locally from Cowberry Crossing Farm, which is a Certified Organic and Certified Biodynamic small family farm located in Claverack, New York. Local wine and beer sponsors are Palate Wine & Spirits and the Newburgh Brewery.

Tickets are $50, and includes a multiple course dinner, as well as wine and beer. To purchase go to: https://eatfeastly.com/meals/d/19328128/salo-newburgh/?rf=fwebbrowpopu

-Photo credit SaloSeries

Sasre

09/01/15 7:30am

Broadway and Mill St Newburgh NY 1920s

Broadway and Mill Street in the 1920’s
Photo: Collection of Newburgh Historical Society, Newburgh, NY

I often romanticize what Newburgh was like in her grand years. Looking at the current situations of blocks like William Street or Lander make it difficult to imagine such a time even existed. After publishing a recent post about the potential of William Street, a reader submitted a wonderful letter depicting what that block was like as a child during the latter part of the Great Depression and just prior to World War II. I thoroughly enjoyed it and I hope you do too. If you ever have personal photos or stories you would like to share, please email me.

Dear Cher,

Your photo of the garage for sale on William Street evoked memories of my childhood as I grew up a block from William Street on Renwick Street. Hence, I thought you might be interested in what I recall of the one block section of William Street that intersected with Renwick Street.

On the corner of Renwick and William Street was a grocery store that had changed ownership over the years. I recall at Christmas time each year the grocery store would sell Christmas trees which the owner lined up on the brick wall of the store on Renwick Street. As children, I recall playing by crawling under the Christmas trees and where a young male friend found a one dollar bill (a large sum of money in those days) while we were crawling under the trees and went running jubilantly home grasping his new found wealth.

Next to the grocery store was a drug store and soda bar owned by the Levine family for many years where many of the families would visit for an ice cream treat served to them over their granite counter with stools. Next to the drug store was the local shoemaker who also served as the “neighborhood bookie” as that is where everyone in the neighborhood went to bet on the numbers. I recall my mother having me take shoes to him for repair and also giving me a penny to play a special number which the shoemaker wrote down on paper for me as a “receipt” which I returned to my mother. I don’t ever recall my mother ever winning!

Further up William Street in the middle of the block was a Jewish bakery shop which sold a variety of fresh baked breads and pastries that was quite a popular bakery at that time. I can also recall as children, we jumped from rooftop to rooftop until we came to the bakery rooftop on William Street and with long sticks which were used to “steal” hot loaves of bread cooling on the outside racks outside the bakery in the back of the store. We then as children ate the bread with fresh picked tomatoes which came from my father’s tomato  garden on Renwick Street.

Across the street form the bakery on William Street was  the local barber shop owned by “Danny the barber” yet another front for a bookie who took all types of betting including horse racing. Needless to say, gambling was common among the local residents of that neighborhood and I can recall many interruptions when Danny was cutting my hair as well as answering the phone to receive bets. Further down the street from the barber was yet another gambling establishment where Ralph’s Poolroom existed and where some of the local male residents played cards in Ralph’s back room where Ralph also sat and collected his “commissions” from the card players. Ralph also supplemented his income by making lemon ice in the summertime which was very popular with the local children in the neighborhood.

William Street and Renwick Street consisted of many homes where children grew up during the depression years of parents, many of whom had emigrated from countries such as Italy, who took pride in their neighborhood as it was quite common to observe how the mothers could  be seen sweeping the front walks in front of their homes each morning. It was a close knit neighborhood in which families supported one another and the children played harmoniously. It is sad to see how this once proud neighborhood has fallen upon difficult times and how many homes have now  been abandoned.

Regards,

Joseph A. Ricciotti
(Former Resident of Renwick Street)

08/31/15 7:30am

Newburgh Landing Park

Although I wasn’t able to attend the meeting for the Newburgh Land Dock and South Street Park design, I was able to attain a copy of the plans. An article from the Mid Hudson News describes the plan and the meeting in depth. Overall, this project is picking up steam again after sitting on the shelf for a while. It’s been three years since it was last mentioned here on the blog. The design is meant to accommodate boats and provide public access to the waterfront.

Did you attend? What did you think of the plans?

Newburgh Landing Pier 1

08/28/15 11:30am

175 S William St Newburgh NY

This is a great building at the corner of South William and William Street. As I’ve mentioned before, this is a tough corner, but one day when William Street is filled with retail again, this will be a great spot to be. It is in walking distance to a lot of retail that honestly just doesn’t exist at the moment. The interior has been worked on and has a lot of improvements. Of course, it’s being advertised as a “Great Investment Moneymaker”. Having a owner living on site would actually be more preferable.

175 S William St Newburgh NY (Rich Honovic)
Asking Price: $89,500
Year Built: 1900
Size: 2,320 sq ft
Taxes: $5,804
Neighborhood: SoBro
Distance to NYC: 57.9 mi, 1 hour 2 mins
Public Transportation: MetroNorth to Beacon, then take ferry, Transit Orange Bus Service
Closest Roadways: 9W, I-87, I-84
Google Map

175 S William Collage

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08/28/15 9:30am

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Photo by NR Flickr user Brian Wolfe. The weekly link roundup is a collection of links related to Newburgh, revitalization, urban planning and anything else that might inspire change or create dialogue.

Newburgh hires first black female officer [THR]
FedEx upgrades Stewart facilities [Mid Hudson News]
Newburgh promoted pedestrian safety [Mid Hudson News]
White Paper recommends Newburgh take small steps for job growth [Mid Hudson News]
Habitat continues Newburgh renovation [THR]
Streets Made By People [Pop Up City]
Johanna Yaun: Trends in Heritage Tourism [NY History Blog]
Google Wants to Help You Install Solar Rooftop Panels [City Lab]
How One Woman Gave Rise to Detroit’s Historic Preservation Movement [Preservation Nation]
Party emphasizes hope for West End [Roanoke.com]

Add your own photos depicting city life to the Newburgh Restoration flickr pool to be used on the blog, or email me. **Flickr users please do not forgot to remove disabling of downloading of pictures. Otherwise I can’t use them**